Uber HK adds taxis to ride hailing app

Octopus Cards has integrated its payment capabilities with HKSTP incubatee Wetaxi Technology Company's new WETAXI HK app (Image RyanJLane / iStockPhoto)
Uber Hong Kong has introduced the new Flash ride hailing option (Image RyanJLane / iStockPhoto)

Uber Hong Kong is introducing a new transportation option for users that will allow them to book the nearest vehicle, whether it is a taxi or UberX, without having to switch apps.

The company is calling on taxi partners to take part in the recently commenced pilot launch of its new Flash option.

Flash rides will be priced the same as an UberX, the base Uber price for a non-shared ride on a standard sized car. The standard Uber infrastructure including ride tracking and customer support will be available through the new service.

Riders will therefore be able to take advantage of all existing features of the Uber app, including estimated time of arrival, ride tracking, in-app communication, split fare and electronic payment.

As part of the launch, riders matched with a Taxi on Flash will be offered two HK$50 discounts for the first week of the pilot, ending on March 11.

Uber already offers taxis on the Uber App in Taiwan, South Korea and Japan, and is now extending the functionality to Hong Kong on a pilot basis.

“We are very excited to launch Flash today and prove to taxi driver-partners that Uber’s technology can significantly enhance their business,” Uber head of public policy for North Asia Émilie Potvin said.

“Our goal is to help taxi partners to be more efficient and make cities more accessible to all. We are committed to making a difference to Hong Kong and we welcome all taxi partners to join us and enjoy what our technology has to offer.”

Suggested Articles

The “MakeITHong Kong 3-2-1 Go! Bang!” event at Science Park will showcase solutions developed by Hong Kong's innovation and technology ecosystem

Over a third of Hong Kong marketers say that they are tasked with leading customer experience initiatives across their organization

Experts believe current public key encryption could be vulnerable to being broken by quantum computing